The Dyson Global Dust Study Reveals If People Are Cleaning Properly

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Let’s take it back to Mar. 2020. The start of the COVID-19 pandemic quickly saw a shift in people’s cleaning habits and behaviors as the concern for public health rose. Hand sanitizer sales soared and cleaning and hygiene became a top priority as people were spending a lot more time at home throughout quarantine, and beyond. But as the world starts to pick back up again more than two years after the first case was discovered in the US, has our attitude towards cleaning changed?

Dyson’s Global Dust Study 2022, undertaken by 12,309 respondents from 11 countries around the world, takes a look at current cleaning routines, attitudes towards dust and dirt, and whether cleaning is being done properly.

The research found that 92 percent of Americans still have a regular routine and are cleaning just as much, if not more than they did last year, to maintain a clean and healthy space. There’s been a rise in reactive cleaners, with 36 percent of Americans being prompted to clean their home when it was dusty or they spotted dirt on the floor (vs. 26 percent in 2020.)

While cleaning regularly is something that many people partake in, only the open spaces are being paid attention to, with other areas of the home—and the little nooks and crannies—commonly being overlooked. 79 percent of US survey respondents do not vacuum their mattresses regularly, while just 33 percent of global respondents reported vacuuming their curtains regularly.

“It is a cause for concern if people only clean when they spot visible dust on the floor as many dust particles are microscopic in size,” says Monika Stuczen, Research Scientist in Microbiology at Dyson. “In fact, by the time people spot visible dust in the home, it is highly likely that there are dust mites in your home.”

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